Good For Us, Bad For Them: The Truth About Essential Oils and Pets

Essential oils have earned their place among those that enjoy and benefit from aromatherapy. From easing nausea to decreasing anxiety, these natural, plant-derived products have been central in the lives of many generations, and now they are part of the natural cure-all trend.

While seemingly safe and advantageous for people, essential oils and pets may be a terrible combination.

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Is It Time to Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

There are many reasons to spay or neuter your pet. The most obvious is, of course, to eliminate the chance of puppies or kittens. But there are also far-reaching health benefits attached to the procedure that deserve attention, too.

The bottom line? This straightforward surgery not only impacts local communities by reducing overpopulation, but positively affects a pet’s longterm health and wellness as well. Win-win!

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Pet Microchipping: There’s No Place Like Home

Having a pet go missing is every owner’s worst nightmare. Of course, you drive around the neighborhood hanging “lost pet” signs and post to your social media pages, but is this enough?

While nothing is foolproof, there is a way to significantly increase the chances of a happy reunion: pet microchipping. This affordable, noninvasive procedure helps return tens of thousands of lost pets each year, and the team at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital wants you to know more about this valuable resource!

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A Stinky Situation: Why Do Dogs Eat Poop?

dogs eat poop

As wonderful as dogs are, they sure have some disgusting habits – drinking from the toilet, licking their own behinds, and eating literally everything (just to name a few!). However, eating poop may top the list of unsavory canine quirks. Honestly, could anything be worse?

Dogs eat poop for a variety of reasons, most of which are totally harmless. However, while this habit may not be cause for concern, understanding the basics behind coprophagia (poop eating) can help you curb the behavior.

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Leptospirosis: An Equal Opportunity Threat

pet bacterial infection prevention

Pet owners have no shortage of decisions to make when it comes to protecting the health of their furry companions. Making sure your pet is protected against disease should top your list of concerns, especially when it comes to something as prevalent as leptospirosis.

This dangerous bacterial infection poses a serious risk to pets and people, and it’s on the rise in the U.S. and Canada. Now is a more important time than ever to know how to safeguard your loved ones, both animal and human.

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Maintain Peaceful Coexistence With Wildlife Safety For Pets

wildlife and pet safety

As one of the most biologically diverse states in the country, New Jersey is home to over 1000 different species of animal wildlife. Coyotes, foxes, raccoons, snakes, and black bears are some of the species that have adapted to life near humans, and it’s not uncommon to encounter one or more during a wilderness excursion or right in our own backyards.

As wonderful as it can be to live a state so richly populated with wildlife, it’s important to stay alert, especially if you own a pet. Interactions between pets and wild animals can have disastrous consequences, which is why it’s so important to make sure you understand and implement the principles of wildlife safety for pets.

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Beware the Medicine Cabinet: The Truth About Pets and Medications

pet poison human medication

When we think about pet-proofing our homes, it makes sense to put away leftover food, cover the garbage bin, and make sure your favorite slippers are out of reach. However, securing the medicine cabinet probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind, but perhaps it should be. The Pet Poison Hotline reports that nearly 50% of all the calls they receive involve human medications, both prescription and over-the-counter.

The team at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital has the scoop on why keeping pets and medications separate is so important.

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Revolution Plus for Cats: Purr-fect Protection

pet parasite prevention medication

You may not be able to wrap your sweet kitten in bubble wrap to protect him from the world, but we are getting better and better at providing excellent defense against potential problems.

Parasites are one of the biggest threats to our pets. Whether it’s heartworm disease carried by mosquitoes, Lyme disease in the tick population, or fleas in out their glory, parasites are a problem. Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital is excited to be able to offer the latest and greatest in parasite prevention for those of the feline persuasion – Zoetis’ Revolution Plus.

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Anesthesia Free Dental Cleanings for Pets: Too Good to Be True?

anesthesia free pet dental cleaning

Pet owners are more savvy than ever, and they are more and more proactive about seeking out the best for their beloved four-legged family members. Knowing the importance of good dental health care, they are seeking out different options for routine teeth cleaning for their pets.

More and more in New Jersey you will find practitioners that are willing to clean your pet’s teeth without anesthesia. When you take into account the risk of anesthesia for pets and its associated costs, this may seem like an obvious choice to make. Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital wants our educated pet owners to understand, though, why anesthesia free dental cleanings for pets are not all they’re cracked up to be.

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For the Love of Pet Safety: What Pet Owners Need to Know About Chocolate Toxicity

pet chocolate toxicity

A heart-shaped box of chocolates is synonymous with Valentine’s Day, but for those of us with dogs, any chocolate in the home can put our canine companion at risk. As we prepare for an onslaught of delicious treats this February, it’s important to be aware of the dangers of chocolate toxicity and take steps to protect our pets.

Chocolate Toxicity

It’s fairly well-known that chocolate is dangerous to dogs, but why? For starters, all forms of chocolate contain caffeine and theobromine, both of which cannot be properly metabolized by dogs or cats.

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