Back to School Blues: Helping Pets Adjust

By: Karen Fazio, CDBC

Back to school is an exciting time for most families, but not always for their pets. Sudden changes in routines, withdrawal of attention, and turning back clocks can cause some pets to exhibit unwanted issues.  These issues can include depression, separation anxiety and destructive behaviors.

Luckily, there are some things we can do, 1-2 weeks before school starts, that may help your pet(s) adjust to such a big change in their schedule and routine.

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Heart to Heart: The Truth About Heartworm in Cats

Heartworm in cats can be a fatal cat disease.If you have a dog, you’ve probably heard about heartworm. Most dog owners are familiar with this threat to their dog’s health, and many know that heartworm prevention is important for dogs. But what about cats?

Heartworm in cats is a growing concern in the veterinary community, but many cat owners don’t know that heartworm is a real threat to their cat’s life. In fact, studies show that less than 5% of cat owners use heartworm prevention in comparison to 50% of dog owners.

With that in mind, Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital thought it was time to have a heart-to-heart chat about heartworm in cats. Continue…

The Word Around the Trough: How to Keep Up With a Hydrated Pet

Black cat drinking out of blue coffee cup on tableThere’s really no better time than August to think about your pet’s hydration needs. In other parts of the calendar year, they just seem to get what they need without too many worries. But these last few weeks of high heat and humidity can cause serious problems for animals. A hydrated pet is a healthy one, and we’ve got some tips and tricks to make it happen.

The Benefits of Water

A hydrated pet is at lower risk of developing a urinary tract infection, and they also have a healthier and more consistent internal body temperature. Water is cooling, maintains high energy levels, and flushes toxins from the body.

Take Notes

Do you know how much water your pet drinks every day? Or, one step further would be to know how much should they be drinking for maximum hydration. On average, the general rule is that for every 10 pounds of body weight, one cup of water is needed per day. If you spend a few days noticing that your 60 pound dog drinks less than 6 cups every day, it’s time to try out some new methods. Continue…