Beyond the Basics: Parasites in Pets

Golden Retriever receiving flea and tick treatment on neckParasites tend to be unpleasant things, and with summer upon us, it may seem like they’re everywhere, just waiting to latch on to your pet! What’s more, seasonal activities, like barbecuing or hiking, can expose your pet to parasites.

Most of us are already familiar with fleas and ticks, but did you know there are other parasites that can also be problematic for your pet? Let’s go beyond the basics to learn more about preventing parasites in pets.

Internal Parasites in Pets

Have you ever wondered why we want to examine your pet’s poop every year? It’s to check for evidence (eggs) of intestinal parasites. Many of these are common in pets, and some are even zoonotic (can be transmitted to humans). Here are some of the most common types of parasites in pets: Continue…

Parasites are Dangerous

by Scott Delaney DVM

sikkes and kitties1Parasites are living creatures that eat, live, and survive at the expense of a host animal.  Parasites are the leading cause of disease in dogs and cats.  Common parasites of dogs and cats in Monmouth County, NJ include heartworms, intestinal worms (roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and tapeworm, to name a few), mites, ticks, and fleas.  All of these parasites can cause serious problems for pets.  The risk of parasites is very high.  Click here to see the prevalence of parasites in your area.  Many pet parasites can also pose a risk to your family.  The good news is that all of these bad bugs can be prevented with a chewable treat that you give to your pet ONCE A MONTH.  (click on blue words)

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Achieve a Full Life With Indoor Cat Enrichment

Indoor cat enrichment.

When we enrich soil, we’re making steps toward improving or enhancing it. As a result, plant life can flourish. The same is true for the pets we care for. Dog owners enrich the lives of their dogs by engaging them with outdoor activities and plenty of exercise. 

The same cannot be said for owners of strictly indoor cats. To protect them from boredom, stress, and anxiety, an approach to indoor cat enrichment can make all the difference. It is also important to consider the kind of enrichment your cat might need. Enrichment for cats in apartments is very different than for those with plenty of space to run around and entertain themselves. Similarly, senior cat enrichment is much different than it is for kittens.

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Plan Ahead: Protect Your Pet During a Natural Disaster – and Afterwards

How to evacuate with a pet.

Although we cannot account for everything in life, the degree to which we are successful in emergencies can directly correspond to a high level of preparation.

When it comes to hurricane season in New Jersey, preparation is key, especially when preparing pet emergency preparedness kits. As you think about protecting yourself and your home, make sure you consider how to evacuate with pets in the unlikely event of an emergency.

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Why Your Cat Is Losing Hair and What to Do

Cat looking at shed hair.

Pet lovers know and accept, to some extent anyways, that pet hair is a part of their life. While you may be able to overlook it on your favorite chair or your black dress pants, pet hair is definitely a little more alarming when you can see signs of hair loss on the animal itself.

If your cat is losing hair at an alarming rate, has bald patches, or sores, it is time for Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital to get involved. 

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Lakes, Ponds, and Water Safety for Dogs

Water safety for dogs.

In our neck of the woods, it’s common to take your dog to the lake for a game of water fetch at the end of the day or on weekends. But there are some considerations for water safety, especially in lakes and ponds. As your partner in your dog’s health, Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital takes you through what you should know about water safety for dogs.

A Swimmer Or No?

Contrary to popular belief, not all dogs can swim. Long-bodied, short-legged, and flat-faced dogs are not anatomically designed for the water. So before you take your dog to the river for a paddle, make sure she can (and wants to!) swim. You can go swimming with your dog on a leash as he or she learns to swim, just make sure not to force them if they are really afraid of the water.

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Pets and Bugs: Keep ‘Em Separated!

keeping pets away from bugs.

One of the trade-offs to the warm weather is, of course, insects. Whether they’re buzzing or crawling around, lying in wait, or simply minding their own business, bugs of all kinds can present serious problems for pets. Painful bites can lead to swelling and itching, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Poisonous stings and even life-threatening bacteria, viruses, or parasites should be prevented. But how do you keep pets and bugs apart?

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Frequently Asked Questions About Heartworm

Pet with heartworm preventive.

Anyone who has visited the veterinarian knows that heartworm preventives are an important element of your pet’s regular wellness care. Besides the need to give your pet this preventive each month, how much do you really know about heartworm and pets? Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital is here to answer some of the most frequently asked questions about heartworm in pets so you can keep your dogs and cats healthy throughout the year:

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Do You Know Your Pet’s Carbon Footprint?

owner holding dog's paw

If you are concerned with your impact on the environment, you may have questioned whether or not your pet has a big carbon footprint.

Although the exact figure varies from pet to pet, there are many aspects of pet ownership that put some stress on the planet. One of the biggest stressors on the environment is the production of pet products; everything from toys, supplies, and even medical procedures creates waste. Transporting these items and pet food also uses gas and emits carbon emissions into the air.

How can you, and eco-conscious pet owner reduce this impact?

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Why Your Dog Licks You, and Is It “Okay”?

dog licking man's head

Sloppy doggie kisses usually come with the territory of dog ownership, but this behavior doesn’t have to over shadow their other positive canine traits. In fact, just like “sit”, “stay”, or “down”, pups can be trained not to lick. After all, it’s not always welcome and it can be kind of…gross. But a slobbery, affectionate dog can also be hard to resist! That brings us to a common question among dog owners and canine appreciators: Is it okay when a dog licks you?

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