To Pee or Not to Pee: Urinary Issues in Cats

Urinary issues in cats should be seen by a veterinarian near you!

One of the more common and potentially frustrating reasons that our clients bring their cats to see us at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital is trouble in the litter box.

While not all urinary problems are created equal, they all do result in significant stress for both feline and caretaker. Urinary issues in cats may not be anyone’s favorite, but you can rest easy knowing that our expert staff has your back should you ever encounter them.

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Ringing in the New Year with Our Top 10 Pet Care Blogs of 2018!

It’s hard to believe that 2018 is coming to a close already! We’ve had an incredible year at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital, and for that, we extend our heartfelt thanks to you!

Our regular pet care blog is just one way we like to give back to our valued clients, and we’re always striving to provide useful, relevant information. We thought you might be interested to know which blogs your peers have found most valuable over the past year. Without further ado, here are our most popular pet care blogs of 2018!

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More Than a Mouthful: Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive Lesions

Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive Lesions are a serious threat to feline dental health

Cats are so amazing and capable of hiding when they are having trouble that they often get the short end of the stick when it comes to proactive care. One area that many of our feline patients need our help in is the department of dental care.

The staff at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital sees quite a bit of dental disease in all of our four-legged patients. In cats, not only is periodontal disease a big issue, but there is also another beast to contend with. Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions, not so fondly also referred to as FORLs, affect a large number of our cat patients and are something all cat owners should understand.

Understanding Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive Lesions

The term feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions is quite the mouthful, and they can be for our cat patients as well. We don’t really understand at this time what causes some cats to be affected by this disease process, but over half of our cat patients over the age of six have them.

FORLs are essentially holes that form in the tooth as a result of the activity of the odontoblasts within the tooth itself. These holes typically form near the gum line and are analogous to the cavities that people suffer, however they have nothing to do with plaque buildup.

We do know that FORLs affect cats tremendously. These sinister little holes can be exquisitely painful. Exposure of the tooth’s pulp cavity can also result in infection. If the hole becomes extensive enough, the crown of the tooth can even break off, leaving roots under the gum line that may result in problems.

Not all cats let us know that they are suffering from FORLs. It is a good idea to make an appointment for us to examine your pet, though, if you notice that your cat is:

  • Drooling
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Reluctant to allow you to look at the teeth
  • Bleeding from the mouth
  • Hesitant to eat
  • Having bad breath

Fighting the Good Fight

Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions can be frustrating for cat owners as well as veterinarians because we don’t really understand at this time how to prevent or stop them. What we can, do, however, is be proactive about looking for them and aggressive when we find them.

Routine oral examinations are an important part of wellness care for any pet, but especially cats. Frequent anesthetized oral evaluations and dental radiographs are important for us to find these painful lesions early. Many times in the early stages it is impossible to identify these without dental x-ray.

Diagnosis And Treatment

When we find FORLs, the exact type of lesion is identified in order to decide how to best proceed. Class I and II FORLs tend to be early in the course of the disease and may be treated with cleaning and/or enamel restoration techniques.

Class III lesions enter the pulp cavity, while Class IV lesions involve broken roots retained under the gum line. These types of FORLs typically require tooth extraction as they are quite painful. Many cats who suffer from FORL lesions will have all or most of the teeth affected at some point. Although most of these pets lose lots of teeth, they are perfectly functional (and much more comfortable) without them.

Working Together

Until science and veterinary medicine understand more about this disease process, it remains important for us to work as a team to be sure that our cats are happy and pain free. By bringing your pet in to see us for wellness visits and allowing routine oral examinations as recommended, you can do your part in battling FORLs.

Good Eats: Pet Nutrition and Fad Diets for Pets

Pet nutrition does not always follow fad diets for pets

Obsessing over our diets is something Americans are good at, and this obsession is easily translated into the world of our pets and what they eat. Not only are there hundreds of different brands of pet food to choose from, but almost everywhere you turn someone is touting the latest dietary trend as the best way to feed your pet.

As stressful as it can be to figure out how to provide your pet with the nutrients they need to live long, healthy lives, the team at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital can walk you through what every pet owner should know when it comes to proper pet nutrition.

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What You Should Know About Kidney Disease in Cats

Kidney disease in cats is a common senior pet health issue.In veterinary medicine there are some diseases and problems that rear their ugly heads more often than others. When it comes to the feline species, it seems that the kidney is the Achilles tendon of the cat. Many, if not most, cats will have trouble with the kidneys as they age.

At Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital we feel that it is important for our feline-loving pet parents to understand what kidney disease in cats looks like and how it can affect their feline friend. Continue…

Keep Calm: How to Make Vet Visits Less Stressful

Make vet visits less stressful!Maybe you’re the lucky human whose pets are as cool as a cucumber at the vet’s office. But for most of us, a trip to the veterinary hospital for our pet’s exam is definitely no walk in the park. Pets can be stressed, anxious, and fearful when traveling to the vet, as well as while in the office, and it’s hard to see our beloved pets in such a state.

But, because we know that regular visits for preventive care – even when your pet is seemingly healthy – is one of the best ways to give them a healthier and happier life, we want to make those visits easier for you and for your pets. So we decided to share some ideas on what we’re doing as well as what you can do as a pet owner to make vet visits less stressful. Continue…

Flummoxed? Weird Cat Behaviors Explained

Some weird cat behaviors can be explainedDoes your cat like to squeeze into the fruit bowl when no one’s watching? Do they twitch all through their body during sleep? And what’s their take on cardboard boxes? We could keep going with the oddball questions, but chances are, you’ve either asked them yourself already – or you’ve got some similarly confusing cat behaviors happening at home. While most feline antics are perfectly normal, sometimes curious behaviors signal problems on the horizon.

But What Does It All Mean?

The following cat behaviors are not only common, they’re 100% normal. As such, we appreciate these amusing (if not sometimes partially aggravating) actions: Continue…

Heart to Heart: The Truth About Heartworm in Cats

Heartworm in cats can be a fatal cat disease.If you have a dog, you’ve probably heard about heartworm. Most dog owners are familiar with this threat to their dog’s health, and many know that heartworm prevention is important for dogs. But what about cats?

Heartworm in cats is a growing concern in the veterinary community, but many cat owners don’t know that heartworm is a real threat to their cat’s life. In fact, studies show that less than 5% of cat owners use heartworm prevention in comparison to 50% of dog owners.

With that in mind, Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital thought it was time to have a heart-to-heart chat about heartworm in cats. Continue…

The Word Around the Trough: How to Keep Up With a Hydrated Pet

Black cat drinking out of blue coffee cup on tableThere’s really no better time than August to think about your pet’s hydration needs. In other parts of the calendar year, they just seem to get what they need without too many worries. But these last few weeks of high heat and humidity can cause serious problems for animals. A hydrated pet is a healthy one, and we’ve got some tips and tricks to make it happen.

The Benefits of Water

A hydrated pet is at lower risk of developing a urinary tract infection, and they also have a healthier and more consistent internal body temperature. Water is cooling, maintains high energy levels, and flushes toxins from the body.

Take Notes

Do you know how much water your pet drinks every day? Or, one step further would be to know how much should they be drinking for maximum hydration. On average, the general rule is that for every 10 pounds of body weight, one cup of water is needed per day. If you spend a few days noticing that your 60 pound dog drinks less than 6 cups every day, it’s time to try out some new methods. Continue…

Paging Dr. Google? How to Find Credible Pet Health Information Online

Pet health information online isn't always credible. Call a local veterinarian.

It seems as though the internet runs our lives, and in some ways it does. Scheduling, researching, working, and planning all typically take place on a computer, smartphone, or tablet. It’s hard to imagine what life would be like without the ubiquitous presence of the internet.

It’s no surprise that many of us turn to online sources for help with health concerns, both for us and for our pets. Although the internet can be a great resource, it can also provide misleading, false, or even dangerous information if we aren’t careful. Finding credible pet health information online can be challenging, but entirely possible once we know what to look for. Continue…