Coping With Pet Loss

Coping with pet loss is as difficult as losing best friend or family member.

Nothing can compare with the deep sadness and feeling of loss that accompanies the passing of a pet. Even though most of us know that we won’t outlive our pets, the loss of the familiar face, personality, and daily interaction can be devastating.

Unfortunately, our society doesn’t take the grief and trauma of pet loss as seriously as it should. So when the time comes to say goodbye to our pet, it can feel as if there is no support and few resources for processing our sadness.

At Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital, we’ve found that taking the time to to honor your pet in a way that is meaningful to you as well as seeking support where you need it can help your family cope and adjust.  

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Senior Pets: How to Keep the Golden Years Going Strong

senior pets have special pet health considerations; ask a veterinarianPets are considered seniors between the ages of 7 and 10 years old, depending on their size. Of course, with advances in veterinary medicine and thoughtful care at home, they can live long past that benchmark. But that doesn’t mean their needs won’t shift slightly. If you’ve had the privilege of watching your pet grow up from infancy through adulthood and beyond, it can be a trial at first to make the right changes. Senior pets can live a long time, especially when you know how to help.

A Single Year

Cats and dogs age faster than humans. While a single year may not seem like a lot to us, those 12 months actually encompass a large amount of a pet’s lifetime.

They also age differently from each other. Dogs (especially larger breeds) have senior needs starting around 7 years old; cats are typically 10 years old before they show significant signs of slowing down. Continue…

Getting to the Root of Periodontal Disease in Pets

periodontal disease in petsBad breath is so common in pets that most of us accept it as a normal part of life. In reality, halitosis in pets is not normal and that doggy or kitty breath you’ve come to expect may be signaling the onset of periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease in pets is a serious issue that affects up to 85% of all dogs and cats by the time they reach 3 years of age. Fortunately, it’s never too late to take charge of your pet’s dental health! Your team at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital is here for you every step of the way.

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Beyond the Basics: Diving Deep Into Dental Cleaning

Dental CleaningMany of us know regular dental cleanings are beneficial to our pets. With over 85% of pets over the age of 3 affected by some form of dental disease, people are becoming more aware of this common but preventable problem. If your pet gets regular dental cleanings, you’ve probably noticed cleaner teeth, fresher breath, and decreased redness around your pet’s gum line. While the results of dental cleanings are great, have you ever wondered what happens during a cleaning? We thought you might!

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Chew on This: Not-so-Frequently Asked (but Important) Pet Dental Questions

The mighty mouth is something we take for granted with our pets. It does its purpose, after all. But did you know there are many aspects of overall health that are directly related to good dental health? That’s right! From heart health to preventing kidney disease, the mouth plays a key role in your pet’s wellness and longevity, not to mention quality of life.

Most pet owners, however, don’t often ask questions about pet dental health, which can sometimes be a disservice to their furry loved one. In an attempt to shine a light on dental care, Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital offers a few pet dental questions every responsible pet owner should ask.

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A Pain in the (R)ear:  Pet Ear Infections

Ear troubles are common among household pets, and most pet lovers have experienced them first hand. A painful and often frustrating problem, pet ear infections are no fun for you or your animal. Good thing your friends at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital are here to help!

All About Pet Ear Infections

Pet ear infections are typically not the same as ear infections that humans experience. When we suffer from an ear infection, the problem usually resides in the middle ear behind the eardrum. While pets can also suffer from this, they most commonly have trouble in the external ear canal and ear flap (pinna). This is called otitis externa.

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