The Heart of the Matter: Valentine’s Day Pet Safety

dog licking wine glass

While Jack Frost may be nipping at our toes, February also brings with it the sweet scent of love in the air. We are, of course, referring to Valentine’s Day. Whether you are coupled or not, chances are there is at least one love in your life to snuggle with this Valentine’s Day: your pet. 

From kitten purrs to playful pups, your pets’ paw prints have likely made a lasting impression on your heart. For this reason, and so many others, the staff at Oakhurst Veterinary Hospital knows how heartbreaking it would be, should your sweet pet fall victim to the dangers this day can bring. 

From chocolates and flowers to candles and feasts, perils and pitfalls for pets abound come the days surrounding February 14, which is why understanding the finer points of Valentine’s Day pet safety is a must for people and their pets. 

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Homemade Pets Treats They’ll Beg For

homemade pet treats

Offering your dog or cat a delicious treat is one of the highlights of pet ownership. While it’s important not to over-indulge our pets (extra weight can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes, joint pain, and more), treats are important for training and overall enjoyment of life.

Commercial pet treats can leave much to be desired, unfortunately. Many are loaded with fillers, food colorings, preservatives, and probably too many calories. Creating your own homemade pet treats is an easy (and cheap!) way to show your pets how much you care.

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For the Love of Pet Safety: What Pet Owners Need to Know About Chocolate Toxicity

pet chocolate toxicity

A heart-shaped box of chocolates is synonymous with Valentine’s Day, but for those of us with dogs, any chocolate in the home can put our canine companion at risk. As we prepare for an onslaught of delicious treats this February, it’s important to be aware of the dangers of chocolate toxicity and take steps to protect our pets.

Chocolate Toxicity

It’s fairly well-known that chocolate is dangerous to dogs, but why? For starters, all forms of chocolate contain caffeine and theobromine, both of which cannot be properly metabolized by dogs or cats.

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